Memory, Mindfulness and Social Justice with My Ngoc To

“The act of remembering is itself a form of mindfulness practice that we can apply personally and collectively as well.”  – Larry Yang

Online workshop date/time:
Thursday, November 5, 2020, 2:00-3:30 PM

Participation in this workshop is FREE; registration is required

Online workshop venue via Zoom:
You are invited to Memory, Mindfulness and Social Justice
When: Nov 5, 2020 02:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://northeastern.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYrdeivqTkqG939hbUQjXO-zFtsJwLRrfXf

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Contact for more information:
Barbara Hamm, TAP Director of Mindful Practice & Trauma-Informed Interventions
Email: tap@violencetransformed.org

Online workshop description:
This workshop builds off of Dr. Angel Acosta’s 400 Years Project, which centers contemplative practice around the history of inequality in the US. The goal of this workshop is to engage with, acknowledge, and awaken ourselves to the dynamics of racism and oppression at all levels. We will learn how to apply mindfulness skills to increase our capacity to connect with our intergenerational resilience as well as relate in more sustainable ways to the ongoing issues of social injustice. In this session, you will have the opportunity to:

    • Engage with mindfulness practice
    • Walk through the 400 Years Timeline
    • Connect with other participants through conversation and reflection
    • Learn about resources to continue the work beyond the session
      By understanding how history lives in each of us and the systems which surround us, we can begin to heal the wounds of historical trauma, both individually and collectively.

By understanding how history lives in each of us and the systems which surround us, we can begin to heal the wounds of historical trauma, both individually and collectively.

Brief Biography:
My Ngoc To is research coordinator and mindfulness instructor at the Center for Mindfulness and Compassion (CMC). Her name, pronounced “ME knock,” means beautiful pearl in Vietnamese. Outside of CMC, she also teaches mindfulness for the Harvard Center for Wellness and the Harvard Ed Portal. Following her drive to advocate for marginalized groups, she is completing a Masters in Social Work at Simmons University after completing a Bachelors in Neuroscience at Harvard. Her research and practice realm focuses on understanding how mindfulness may help individuals and communities heal from historical and intergenerational trauma. Her website is www.myngocto.com.

TAP is supported by funds from the Federal Victims of Crime Act of 1984. These VOCA funds are awarded by the Massachusetts Office for Victim Assistance.


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